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The activities of the medico – social offices in Berdiansk and Zaporizhia (Zaporizhia region) and Kharkiv (Kharkiv region)

After a period of relative peace in May 2016, the situation in eastern Ukraine is volatile and unstable. According to reports by the OSCE’s special representative, the Minsk Agreements are being violated. The fighting continues at the line of contact near Donetsk airport and Avdiivka, near Horlivka, and recently also in the eastern part of Mariupol. Despite the worsening security situation, the Novotroitske checkpoint was opened on 16 May, which took the pressure off other checkpoints in Donetsk oblast. In Luhansk oblast, the crossing point at Stanytsia Luhanska is now open. According to official data of the State Border Guard Service, the line of contact has been crossed by approx. 3 million people since the start of the year, which means close to 20,000 crossings every day.

The activities of the medico – social offices in Berdiansk and Zaporizhia (Zaporizhia region) and Kharkiv (Kharkiv region)

The project aims to provide specialist medical care that will comprise: professional diagnosis, surgery, access to the necessary medication and hygiene products, preventive healthcare for displaced persons and residents who are most in need, i.e. lonely, older, and disabled people, large families, and single mothers from Zaporizhzhya and Kharkiv oblasts.

The activities of the medico – social offices in Berdiansk and Zaporizhia (Zaporizhia region) and Kharkiv (Kharkiv region)

The project was implemented between 9 August and 31 December 2016. The goals set at the planning stage were all fully achieved. Three social and medical clinics were put into operation and dispensed a total of 9,347 instances of medical advice and treatments. The clinics contributed to a reduction in the number of patients and the monitoring of chronic diseases and reduced the scope of self-medication and improper treatment. Adequate medical assistance was provided to displaced persons and the needy inhabitants of the Zaporizhia Oblast and the Kharkiv Oblast who were unable to afford to use public medical care.