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Development of knowledge and skills of public administration and local government of Ukraine to improve energy efficiency - impact on innovation in district heating sector, including the rational use of renewable energy sources


One of the issues ailing Ukraine is the bad state of its heating systems. They are obsolete (dating from the 1960s-80s), while installations in boiler plants (boilers, automatic controls) and in heat distribution networks are energy inefficient (heat losses of up to 25%). The rising costs of urban heating mean that the number of people and businesses falling behind their power bill payments is growing every year, which in turn increases the risk of disruptions to heat supply to buildings. Attempts to remedy this situation have so far been ad-hoc and one-off (e.g. addressing problems with heating individual schools).

Heating policy is mostly shaped by public and local government administration, hence the need to adapt it for urgent modernisation of the existing heating systems, among others in order to develop scenarios for transforming the heating industry and its environment and build balances of use and supply of heat and feed fuels.

Project measures followed up on and expanded the successful PPR 2011 project titled “Support programme for Ukrainian Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in improving energy efficiency and implementing innovative technologies to use the energy of biomass and waste” (no. 93/2011), carried out by the Institute of Power Engineering and the Lviv State Centre of Science, Innovationsand Informatization. The previous project focused on technical issues involved in improving energy and renewable energy sources (RES) efficiency, while the new one focuses on improving energy efficiency in the heating industry.

Development of knowledge and skills of public administration and local government of Ukraine to improve energy efficiency - impact on innovation in district heating sector, including the rational use of renewable energy sources


The project was carried out between 1 March 2014 and 31 December 2014 in Lviv, Ukraine, and in Siedlce and Warsaw, Poland. The implementing entity was the Energy Research Integration Centre CENERG of the Institute of Power Engineering, with the Lviv State Centre of Science, Innovations and Informatization (LCNII) as the local partner.

The project addressed the issue of the bad state of Ukraine’s heating systems. Heating policy is mostly shaped by public and local government administration. The project aimed to raise their competencies in implementing solutions that improve power efficiency and the rational use of renewable sources of energy in the heating industry on a local level. Project measures focused on the heating industry as the most important item of energy supply costs – in the budgets of local governments and households.

The goal of enhancing administration competencies and knowledge was attained by interactive training which outlined the possibilities of formulating heating policy in cities, districts and communes, taking into account the methodology of mapping local heat markets. Participants built heat maps of selected cities by themselves, using simplified computational tools developed by Polish experts. The acquired knowledge allowed the administration to assess scenarios of heat industry modernisation and select best solutions in their location.

The project was carried out under priority 8 – Regional development and capacity building of public and local administration.

Development of knowledge and skills of public administration and local government of Ukraine to improve energy efficiency - impact on innovation in district heating sector, including the rational use of renewable energy sources


The project trained 44 representatives of public and local government administration with a view to developing strategies for improving the energy efficiency of heating systems. A simplified computational tool was developed in order to build a primary map (balance) of thermal energy use and supply, taking into account power from renewable sources and other energy carriers together with operating instructions. Twenty three people were also trained in preparing maps of heat use and supply for Ukrainian cities using real data.

Twenty two people were acquainted with the practical aspects of Poland’s heat management transformation and with local heating development alternatives. At a meeting with a representative of the city of Siedlce and the president and staff delegation of Przedsiębiorstwo Energetyczne PEC w Siedlcach, the beneficiaries received recommendations with respect to the organisation of the city’s utility services, relations between the municipality and other entities, and managing utility-related matters within the local government’s territory. Moreover, the beneficiaries were offered recommendations concerning investment in heating companies.

Twenty eight people were trained to develop a target map of heat use and supply for selected towns in Ukraine for a chosen development scenario. Five heat maps were produced. Conclusions and recommendations on how to modernise Ukraine’s heating industry were compiled in a report, which was disseminated throughout local government units.

Acquired in the training on developing scenarios for transforming the heating industry and its environment, building balances of heat use and supply of heat and feed fuels, including renewable energy sources, and on implementing effective mechanisms for assessing energy efficiency of ventures, such knowledge and skills are a first step towards changes in Ukraine’s heating industry.