Polska pomoc

 

Tools for Development. Improving the quality of secondary and vocational education in Dodoma and Shinyanga regions in Tanzania through modernization and equipment of libraries and introducing training program in schools in Dodoma and Didia.

One of the priorities of the Tanzania Education Sector Development Programme is “improving the quality of education, with emphasis on the creation of conducive teaching and learning environments.” Despite great efforts to ensure education for children and young people of school age in the last 20 years, Tanzania continues to struggle with many problems in education. At secondary school level, the scholarisation index rose from 5.6% in 1997 to over 35% in 2012; however, this was accompanied by a considerable drop in the quality of education. The reasons for the low level of education continue to include a lack of qualified teaching staff, a lack of access to educational materials as well as inadequate infrastructure and limited access to laboratories and libraries (more than 76% of the secondary schools in Tanzania have no libraries or computer laboratories).

The project, implemented in partnership with two Don Bosco secondary schools in Dodoma and in Didia, is a comprehensive response to the above problems. The existing libraries were too small and ill-equipped, the book collections outdated and the number of school books insufficient.

The expansion of the libraries, construction of a computer laboratory and furnishing of both of the aforementioned educational facilities with books and computers, combined with supplementary training, will give students and teachers comprehensive access to diverse and modern developmental tools (books, computers with internet access, training), providing a better start for young people who are about to enter the labour market.

Tools for Development. Improving the quality of secondary and vocational education in Dodoma and Shinyanga regions in Tanzania through modernization and equipment of libraries and introducing training program in schools in Dodoma and Didia.

The main problem in education of young people from poor families at the secondary and vocational school levels is the lack of suitable conditions for study, a lack of access to basic educational materials such as books as well as a lack of access to computers. In the Don Bosco secondary schools in Dodoma and in Didia, libraries had been established earlier, but there were not enough funds to buy all the necessary books and suitable equipment, or to organise training for the teachers. In response to the above needs, the project involved:

- expansion and modernisation of the existing infrastructure of the libraries and additional furnishing (addition of a reading room in the school in Didia and expansion of the library in the school in Dodoma), providing young people with comfortable conditions for after-school study;

- supplying libraries with books, dedicated library computers and software, enabling young people to gain knowledge;

- establishing a computer laboratory in the school in Dodoma, equipped with 30 computers with internet access, enabling young people to work independently and giving them new educational opportunities;

- conducting library training and implementing a programme to promote reading, making it easier for young people (including young people from outside the school) to effectively use the libraries;

- raising the skills of teachers in vocational counselling, to better prepare young people for the labour market or for continuing their education in higher-education institutions.

Thanks to the project’s implementation, the schools will be fully equipped, have skilled teaching staff and be able to prepare young people, including those from disadvantaged environments (directly about 2,000 persons), to meet the requirements of the labour market. The project will result in higher quality of education and better skills gained by the students, improving their chances in the labour market as well as their living conditions.

Tools for Development. Improving the quality of secondary and vocational education in Dodoma and Shinyanga regions in Tanzania through modernization and equipment of libraries and introducing training program in schools in Dodoma and Didia.

As a result of the project’s implementation, new reading rooms were built in Dodoma and in Didia as well as a computer room in Didia, while the libraries were modernised and refurnished. Training was organised for the librarians in the use of library software and for teachers in vocational counselling. Moreover, a group of school students took part in a pilot training programme on vocational counselling.

In Didia, a new floor was added to the building, measuring about 380 m2, while the library was modernised and expanded. In Dodoma, the library was modernised and its area expanded to 56 m2. A computer laboratory with an area of 60 m2 was also installed. The new premises were fully furnished and the modernised libraries were supplied with new shelves, tables and chairs. In addition, in Didia, photovoltaic panels were installed, thanks to which the library and reading room have a constant supply of electricity. Both libraries were also equipped with multimedia projectors. A total of 7,213 books were purchased for both libraries. In addition, 40 computers were bought, including five with library software, and then turned over for use to the library’s young users. Two additional computers were bought for the librarians, complete with library software. All of the computers have original operating systems and up-to-date anti-virus software. Two librarians took part in the library training and 70 people in the teacher training.

As a result of the above infrastructure and training measures, the libraries in Dodoma and Didia are among the few libraries in Tanzania that are computerised, operate on the basis of dedicated software and are serviced by trained personnel. The teachers of both schools, in Dodoma and in Didia, were trained on how to provide vocational counselling for the students. It is estimated that the project encompassed more than 2,800 students from secondary and vocational schools. This number is expected to grow in the coming years.